Melbourne is the World’s Most Liveable City Again!

For sixth year in a row, Melbourne has been holding the crown for being the world’s most liveable city. The survey conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) was based on an index score of 140 in healthcare, education, stability, culture, environment and infrastructure.

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Source: Economist Intelligence Unit

This year, Melbourne scored 97.5 out of 100, defeating Vienna and Vancouver who sits in the second and third position respectively. Another two of Australian capital cities also made it to the top 10, which are Adelaide and Perth. Whilst Sydney ranked seventh last year, they got bounced out from the position due to a “heightened perceived threat of terrorism”. While Melbourne received almost perfect score on the five categories, the general public believe that the city deserves the title from other extraordinary charms that it has, such as the diversity of people, the art, the sport culture, even the nightlife and coffee.

Lord Mayor Robert Doyle said that all Melburnians should be proud of the title and it should not be something to be taken for granted. He mentioned that the city is consistently planning and implementing policies that will continue to improve everyone’s life quality.

“It is an exciting time in Melbourne: we’ve got many major infrastructure projects underway including the Metro Tunnel, and the proposed renewal of the Queen Victoria Market precinct. It is also the little things also make a big difference: planting more trees, recycling stormwater, making more parks and green spaces, providing better paths and connections for pedestrians and cyclists, as well as embracing technology and data to improve our operations,” Doyle said.

A summary of the liveability ranking and overview by the EIU shows that Tehran, Dubai and Kathmandu are some cities that have the most improved liveability scores over five years, while Moscow, Paris and Athens have the biggest declines. The report says that the global business centres tend to be victims of their own success. Higher crime rates are often found in cities that have overstretched infrastructure, congestion and public transport problems.

Sources: ABC News, Economist Intelligence Unit, Herald Sun, The Age